Connor Gorman and Joe Marsh will lead the Huskies for the 2019-2020 Men's Hockey season.

Coaching Update for New Hampton School’s Men’s Ice Hockey

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New Hampton School tapped two familiar names in Husky Nation to lead a men’s ice hockey program with a storied tradition. After a national search, Head of School Joe Williams appointed current New Hampton School faculty member and 2011 graduate Connor Gorman as the new head coach. Former New Hampton and legendary St. Lawrence University men’s hockey coach Joe Marsh will serve as associate head coach and special advisor to the program.
A teacher and two-sport coach at New Hampton School for the past year, Gorman takes over the head coaching reigns for Casey Kesselring, who coached the team the last six seasons. Marsh, who retired from St. Lawrence in 2012 after more than a quarter century at the helm, most recently coached the Dartmouth Women’s Ice Hockey team in 2017-2018, serving as the Interim Head Coach.
Connor Gorman and Joe Marsh will lead the Huskies for the 2019-2020 Men's Hockey season.
Connor Gorman ’11 takes the helm as the Men’s Varsity Ice Hockey Head Coach for the 2019-2020 season. He will be supported by Associate Head Coach Joe Marsh.
“This is an incredible opportunity for our student-athletes to learn from Connor Gorman, one of the strongest up-and-coming coaches in New England and Joe Marsh, an icon in the sport,” said Williams. “As a graduate of the school, Connor clearly understands the demands of this position and the responsibility to cultivate and implement a strong vision for the program. Our students and Connor will benefit from Coach Marsh’s wisdom, his mentorship, and his far-reaching network in the amateur and professional hockey world.”
The newly aligned coaching staff of Gorman and Marsh will work together to attract mission-appropriate student-athletes and provide them with an elite educational experience on and off the ice. With the recently opened Jacobson Ice Arena as a wonderful setting, the coaching staff will help members of the program develop for the next level and navigate the college recruiting process.

Ready and focused

A two-year student at New Hampton School before moving on to junior hockey with New Hampshire Monarchs, Gorman enjoyed a four-year career at Division III powerhouse SUNY Plattsburgh. He scored 68 points in 104 games for Plattsburgh before playing two years of professional hockey with the Peoria Riverman of the Southern Professional Hockey League where he tallied 90 points in 115 games as a pro.
“I am humbled and honored to be given the opportunity as the next leader of the New Hampton School hockey program,” Gorman said. “As a graduate, I know how amazing this school and community is. I look forward to developing our players on and off the ice so they can reach the next level of their careers. But most importantly, I am looking forward to seeing them grow into young men who embody our school values.”
Gorman joined the faculty at New Hampton School in August 2018 and impressed the community early as an instructor in the Academic Support Program, an advisor, house parent and head coach of the Varsity B hockey team. He also supported the Varsity A team in practices and outreach with prospective families. Gorman was the most valuable player of the 2011 New Hampton School hockey team and played varsity lacrosse at New Hampton and Plattsburgh. A native of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, Gorman attended St. John’s Prep before becoming one of New Hampton School’s most prolific scorers, racking up 96 points in 71 games.  Gorman had 37 goals and 29 assists for the Huskies in 2011.
“From the time I met Connor and his parents, I knew right away that supreme leadership was present in Connor’s character,” said longtime Plattsburgh coach Bob Emery. “For the next four years, he possessed that leadership in helping our team reach great levels of success. He will no doubt continue displaying great leadership along with his hockey knowledge at New Hampton.”

A returning legend

A native of Lynn, Massachusetts, Marsh began his coaching career at New Hampton School in 1976 as Coach Mike McShane’s assistant hockey coach and a math teacher. When McShane left in 1978, Marsh was the clear leader to follow in his footsteps and advance the Men’s Hockey Program. Over time he compiled a 56-5 record. He then went on to achieve a 13-5-1 record and the league title at Choate Rosemary Hall in Connecticut. A 1976 graduate of the University of New Hampshire, Joe joined the St. Lawrence staff as an assistant coach in 1983, again following McShane’s leadership. Marsh took over as head coach at the start of the 1985-86 season.
While at St. Lawrence, Marsh compiled a record of 468-399-72 in 26 seasons, the most career victories of any active ECAC coach at the time of his retirement, and he became the third coach in NCAA Division I history to accrue more than 400 wins at one institution. He won the Spencer Penrose Award as NCAA Division I Coach of the Year twice, and he was a four-time ECAC Coach of the Year. He won five ECAC championships, took teams to eight NCAA tournaments and made two Frozen Four appearances. He had a streak of 22 straight ECAC tournament appearances with five ECAC Championships. He coached 18 All-America players, seven Hobey Baker finalists, six ECAC Player of the Year Award winners, four ECAC Rookies of the Year, five ECAC Outstanding Defensive Forward award winners and five ECAC Outstanding Defensive Defenseman award winners.
Marsh retired in May of 2012 following a 26-year career which included some of the brightest moments in program history.
Former player and NHS alumnus Scott Peters ’80 remembers Marsh as a coach who set high expectations and helped his players exceed them. “[There was an] expectation that you gave 100% in everything you did, both on the ice and off the ice as an individual. [Marsh] had such a presence about him even at the early age when he coached at NHS. He was an incredible leader and his players were envious to follow the leader. He was very impressionable to young teenage hockey players and young men.”

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